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The Fashionably Warm Scarf

No matter what your style — Scarves can add some needed fashion to your winter wardrobe.

Wrapping your neck with a scarf can add degrees of heat to the chilly winter day. wrap a black silk scarf around your neck to keep your outfit just as fancy as you. If you are more of a casual being, a thick scarf knit with yarn can be added to leggings, sweatpants, or denim and look just as good with any of these. This is the easiest way to warm up any outfit you have, so if you’re pressed for time, make this the one addition you make.


You can wear your scarf in various combinations; as a simple tie. double knot look where you fold the scarf in half and wrap it around your neck, then feed the ends through a twist in the scarf. Another scarf that people tend to lean towards is an infinity scarf. People can just put it over their head, twist it once and put it over the head again and then boom, they’re done. They’re covered, they’re warm and they’re stylish. You can throw it on under a jacket or over a sweater and it looks cute.

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Tech form now matters as much as tech function

The dance between technology and fashion has always been a rather ungainly one, characterized by awkward stumbling, accidental toe-treading and unexpected knees in the groin.

Neither world is really certain what it’s supposed to be doing with the other. Products deemed to combine style with cutting-edge credibility tend to leave the public cold, whether that’s a celebrity-endorsed gadget or solutions to problems that don’t exist (Bluetooth glove-phones, rechargeable handbag chargers). But as technology shrinks, form and style start to become much more important.

The arrival of wearable technology into the marketplace has been muted by this truth. There’s little point in making wearables that people don’t find alluring enough to wear, and while technology companies tie themselves up in knots over the functionality of, say, a smartwatch, the fact is that we require very little from a watch. For most people, aesthetic appeal is more important. That’s why a team of 100 designers is rumored to be working on Apple’s much-anticipated “iWatch”: while the mass adoption of wearable technology is primarily a social battle, it’s one that can be won a whole lot quicker if the product looks cool and feels desirable.

Small wonder, then, that technology companies are beginning to court figures from the fashion world like desperate singletons at a speed-dating event. The departure of Burberry’s Angela Ahrendts for a job at Apple comes only a few weeks after Yves St Laurent’s Paul Deneve made the same move. Google, still engaged in a long-term pre-launch battle for public acceptance for Google Glass, scored a win when Diane von Furstenberg’s models wore the futuristic spectacles at last autumn’s New York Fashion Week. Samsung sent Galaxy Gears watches up the catwalk in Milan with Moschino; Kenzo designed covers for Google’s Nexus 7 tablet at Paris Fashion Week, while those on the front row at Roksanda Ilincic’s recent show in London were slipped a free pair of stylish Sennheiser Momentum headphones. With the attitudes of taste-makers so important in the often sniffy world of fashion, you can hardly blame those technology companies who suddenly find themselves plunged into the luxury accessories market for attempting such overt seduction.

But what do the fashion companies get out of this liaison? Does any kudos flow the other way? “The fashion and beauty worlds were very slow to the digital party,” says Tyler. “Until a couple of years ago there were barely any decent e-commerce websites, and luxury brands were in denial about what technology could do for them – mainly because they were steeped in heritage. But that’s changing.


That developing link with technology was highlighted at Dressed To Code, a “fashion hackathon” hosted by Glamour magazine last month at New York Fashion Week, where coders (split 50/50 between men and women) convened to merge the worlds of technology and fashion through the development of mobile apps. It’s hardly a marriage made in heaven, but perhaps the geek and the chic are finally getting it together.

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The must have pink coat for you.

Pink Coat

Every season some high-street outlet – sometimes Whistles, sometimes Zara, occasionally M&S – will knock out a decent garment that happens to be quite similar to one seen on the runways.

The fashion magazines have been excited over the M&S coat because various high-end designers made pink coats this season.

 

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A pink coat at the Osman show. Photograph: Tim P Whitby/Getty Images

Has there ever been a more perfect trend for fashion retailers than a pink coat? Coats are the one type of clothing that everyone accepts should be expensive. Because a coat is something that needs to be good quality: it needs to be warm, it ideally should be waterproof and it needs to withstand daily wear. Ergo, expenditure is acceptable.

Let’s look again at the pink coat. Pink coats are, quite elegant, with the youthful playfulness in them. Yes, it’s a bold look. But it also looks incredibly chic and makes the perfect statement outfit.  It’s not just bright pink either; pastel shades were seen at Topshop Unique, Carven, Jonathan Saunders and Celine; to name just a few.

These Coats are pared back, understated and elegant. Manly silhouettes help to counteract the girly color of the fabric.

Bubblegum pinks are the standout tones for autumn and can look elegant and grown-up for evening or officewear.


Look for unexpected fabrics and textures to create interest in your outfit, like sequins and faux fur – this contrast will work especially well if you’re planning a top-to-toe pink look. Think fluffy pink angora jumper teamed with a vinyl pink pencil skirt.